The Latest

One of favorite restaurants and fav booths #me #mrjohnnyblack #CasGnar
 (at Casey’s Family Restaurant)
Aug 31, 2014 / 1 note

One of favorite restaurants and fav booths #me #mrjohnnyblack #CasGnar (at Casey’s Family Restaurant)

Aug 31, 2014 / 6,093 notes

gameraboy:

The Cat’s Out (1931)

(via xmadam-me)

bitter-vow:

Same
Aug 31, 2014 / 191 notes
Aug 30, 2014 / 664 notes
Aug 30, 2014 / 263 notes

type-lover:

LE VENT Dino Buzzati
by Antoine Elsensohn

(via wakeg)

Aug 30, 2014 / 2,697 notes

Jiminy cricket, he flew the coop!

(via stellarwonderland)

Aug 30, 2014 / 120,167 notes

(via ivana022)

Aug 30, 2014 / 20 notes
f4iryblue:


🍄·•✨
Aug 29, 2014 / 422 notes
#DiamondLake #lookout #Oregon #oregonexplored #sunset #nature #PacificNorthWest #CasGnar #mrjohnnyblack
Aug 28, 2014

#DiamondLake #lookout #Oregon #oregonexplored #sunset #nature #PacificNorthWest #CasGnar #mrjohnnyblack

#Clearwater #falls #Oregon #oregonexplored #PacificNorthWest  #nature #me #CasGnar #mrjohnnyblack
Aug 28, 2014 / 2 notes

#Clearwater #falls #Oregon #oregonexplored #PacificNorthWest #nature #me #CasGnar #mrjohnnyblack

Aug 26, 2014 / 2,858 notes
i-love-art:

By: Benjamin Garcia
Follow: Facebook - Behance - Tumblr 
Aug 26, 2014 / 574 notes
Aug 26, 2014 / 15,834 notes
Showgirls photographed by Gordon Parks, New York, 1958 (via)

(via harlequinfairy)

Aug 26, 2014 / 4,322 notes

asylum-art:

NeSpoon Polska: Lace Street Art
  on Behance
Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon uses ornate lace patterns in her unique brand of street art that translates into ceramics, stencils, paintings, and crocheted webbing installed in public spaces. NeSpoon refers to her art as “public jewelry,” specifically as an act of beautification by turning abandoned and unadorned spaces into something aesthetically pleasing. You can see much more over Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon uses ornate lace patterns in her unique brand of street art that translates into ceramics, stencils, paintings, and crocheted webbing installed in public spaces. NeSpoon refers to her art as “public jewelry,” specifically as an act of beautification by turning abandoned and unadorned spaces into something aesthetically pleasing.

(via asylum-art)